2019 Alphabet Soup Challenge | Hosted by Escape With Dollycas Into A Good Book

alphabet soup challenge
This is my signup post for the 2019 Alphabet Soup Challenge hosted by Escape With Dollycas Into A Good Book.

Alphabet Soup Challenge is probably the longest but easiest reading challenge popular in the web. I do not want to be left out so I decided to take up the challenge this year.

The rules are very simple. Just read a book that has a title that starts with every letter of the alphabet except for the letters X, Q and Z. It happens that I have books that start with those annoying letters. These three letters can appear in any part of the title. The articles a, an and the do not count. For example, I will list The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time under letter C. Borrowed books, ebooks and audiobooks count, too.

To find more about this challenge and to sign up visit Escape With Dollycas Into A Good Book.


Here’s my list for this challenge.

A – Annihilation by Jeff Vandermeer
B – Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
C – The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time by Mark Haddon<
D – Diary by Chuck Palahniuk
E – Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman
F – Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
G – A God in Ruins by Leon Uris
H – The Hours by Michael Cunningham
I – It by Stephen King
J – Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
K – The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick NessL – L.A. Confidential by James Ellroy
M – Meshuga by Isaac Bashevis Singer
N – The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
O – Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
P – Pride and Prejudice and Passports by Corrie Garrett
Q – Quicker than the Eye by Ray Bradbury
R – Red Sparrow by Jason Matthews
S – Speaker for the Dead by Orson Scott Card
T – T Zero by Italo Calvino
U – Ubik by Philip K. Dick
V – Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
W – We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
X – Xenocide by Orson Scott Card
Y – Youth by Isaac Asimov
Z – The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection From the Living Dead by Max Brooks

Challenge Progress:

6 / 25 books. 24% done!

Titles in bold are those that I have already read. Links will redirect you to my reviews.

Are you also up for the challenge?

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2019 Book to Movie Reading Challenge #Book2MovieRC

2019 Book to Movie
This is my signup post for the 2019 Book to Movie Reading Challenge. This challenge is hosted by Michelle @ Gather Together and Read.


I love watching movies as much as I love reading books. When a movie adaptation of a favorite book comes out to the theaters, I make sure that I go and invite some friends to watch. It is one of the rare opportunities to discuss a beloved book to my non-reader friends. I especially enjoy pointing out what the different between the book and the movie to my friends. And if I’m being silly, I would throw in some spoilers and laugh while doing it.

I’m participating in Level 3B of the challenge. This level will require me to read more than four book from any release year and watch more than four movies from any release year.

I’m considering the following titles for the challenge:

The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness

It by Stephen King

Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer

Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane

Stories of Your Life and others by Ted Chiang

No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy

What’s good about this challenge is that you can sign-up anytime you want. Just read the rules here and start reading and watching. Also don’t forget to use the tag #Book2MovieRC when you’re posting contents on the web.

Review: The Ballad of Yaya Vol. 1: Fugue

Genre: Coming-of-age, War Fiction, Children’s Story, Graphic Novel

Written by: Jean-Marie Ormont, Patrick Marty, Charlotte Girard

Series: The Ballad of Yaya, 1

Illustrations: Golo Zhao

Number of Pages: 96

My Rating:


Fugue is the first volume of The Ballad of Yaya. It follows the adventures of Yaya and Tuduo in war-torn Shanghai.

Yaya is a talented 8-year old girl who single-mindedly follows her wish to audition for a piano performance. She sneaks out of her home the morning her family is set to leave town to escape the war. While Tuduo is a young street acrobat. Homeless and abused by the gang boss he’s working for, he decides to entrust his younger brother to a monastery and flee from the town himself. Together, Yaya and Tuduo must muster up the courage to face the painful realities of war and growing up.

Jean-Marie Omont, Patrick Marty and Charlotte Girard wrote this great adventure of the dynamic duo. Golo Zhao’s illustrations gave the prose richer imagery that evokes a myriad of emotions. The Ballad of Yaya is a nine-part comic series targeted to both young and mature readers. If you have seen and loved Grave of the Fireflies, you should also read this great work.

The Ballad of Yaya Vol 1: Fugue is expected to be released on April 23rd 2019 by Lion Forge

ARC was provided by NetGalley in exchange for my review.

Drop you comments below if you also loved this book. If not, let me know as well by commenting below.

The girl who danced with spies | Book Review: Red Sparrow


Red Sparrow
Jason Matthews

Red Sparrow #1
ISBN 9781476706122
Thriller, Suspense, Spy fiction
431pages

 

 

3star

Literary Awards

ITW Thriller Award for Best First Novel (2014), Edgar Award for Best First Novel (2014)


Dominika Egorova danced all her life. When her career as a ballerina spirals down after a jealous dancer injures her, she has nowhere else to go. Not until her Uncle Ivan (Vanya) Egorov goes to her father’s funeral and offers her a job in SVR, the Russian Intelligence Agency. She accepts and becomes the bait for an assassination of a Russian mobster who openly criticizes the government and the prime minister. As the sole witness, Dominika has be eliminated as well. Instead, Vanya sends her to Sparrow school where she will learn to become a seductress for SVR. After finishing her training with high marks, she goes to Helsinki to seduce and operate against Nathaniel Nash.

Continue reading “The girl who danced with spies | Book Review: Red Sparrow”

2019 Goodreads Reading Challenge

Goodreads annually holds this challenge. Its users have the flexibility to choose what and how many books to read within the year. To date, 2,251,122 participants signed-up for the challenge with a total of 119,272,169 books pledged.

MY PROGRESS

2019 Reading Challenge

2019 Reading Challenge
Rox has
read 8 books toward
her goal of
60 books.
hide

 

I particularly like My Year in Books section which features my reading activities and achievements for the year. Unfortunately, I did not complete the challenge last year. This year, I will do better. To know my bookish goals for 2019, read here.

 

Here’s my reading statistics from last year.

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Book Review | The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness


The Knife of Never Letting Go
Patrick Ness

Chaos Walking #1
ISBN 9780763676186
Thriller, Suspense, Spy fiction
512pages


5star

Literary Awards

Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize (2008), James Tiptree Jr. Award (2008), Green Mountain Book Award (2012)em>


Todd Hewitt is the only boy in Prentisstown, New World. He is one month awayfrom becoming an adult. With a dog as his only friend, he is impatient toturn thirteen and be among the 146 men in the all-male community.

 

In the New World, everyone hears everybody else’s thoughts. Noise is everywhere resulting from the virus released by the alien race during a brutal war. The virus left all women dead and men infected with the Noise. When Todd finds a hole in the Noise which is a girl, he is forced to flee from Prentisstown.

  Continue reading “Book Review | The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness”

Book Review: Bedtime Eyes by Amy Yamada


Bedtime Eyes
Amy Yamada

Original Title: ベッドタイムアイズ
Translated by Yumi Gunji and Marc Jardine
ISBN 9780312352264
Literary Fiction
224 pages

4star

Literary Awards

Bungei Prize (1985), Akutagawa Prize nominee (1985)


Continue reading “Book Review: Bedtime Eyes by Amy Yamada”

Book Review: A Monster Calls


A Monster Calls
Patrick Ness

Inspired by the original idea by Siobhan Dowd
Illustrations by Jim Kay
ISBN 9781406361803
Young Adult Fiction, Coming-of-Age
237pages


5star

Kate Greenaway Medal (2012), Galaxy British Book Awards for Children’s Book of the Year (2011), Red House Children’s Book Award (2012), Prix Imaginales for Jeunesse (2013), Galaxy National Book Award for Children’s Book of the Year (2011), Grampian Children’s Book Award Nominee (2013), The Kitschies for Red Tentacle (Novel) (2011), Carnegie Medal (2012), Prix Elbakin.net for Meilleur roman fantasy traduit Jeunesse (2012)

Seven minutes past midnight, Connor O’Malley wakes up and finds a thirty-foot monster by his bedside window. He’s been expecting a monster but this one is different from his frequent nightmares. It wants to tell him three stories and when it’s done Connor has to tell it his own story–the truth he is afraid of facing.


Continue reading “Book Review: A Monster Calls”

Book Review: It Ends With Us


It Ends with us
Colleen Hoover

ISBN 9781501110368
Romance, Domestic Fiction
385 pages

 

 

1star

Literary Awards

Goodreads Choice Award for Romance (2016) and Nominee for Best of the Best (2018)



Ryle Kincaid is a rich, handsome, neurosurgeon who has an unusual fetish for one night stands. It all changed when he meets Lily Bloom, a flower shop owner from Maine. They fall in love, become husband and wife, and eventually have a child. They are the perfect couple until Atlas Corrigan returns to Lily’s life.

Continue reading “Book Review: It Ends With Us”

Review: Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine


Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine
Gail Honeyman

ISBN 9781501110368
Psychological Fiction
327 pages

4star

Literary Awards

Costa Book Award for First Novel (2017), Audie Award for Fiction (2018), Australian Book Industry Award (ABIA)


Eccentric, eloquent Eleanor Oliphant is fine on her own. Each day of her life is carefully laid out: doing her crossword puzzles during office breaks, chatting with mummy over the phone every Wednesday and drinking vodka on weekends. She’s completely fine keeping her distance from her colleagues and minimizing social interactions until she meets Raymond from IT.

Continue reading “Review: Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine”